Research on Oxidata: Malondaildehyde in urine and free radical testing | Glutathione and Oxidata

This abstract represents a paper that was presented at the Federated Experimental Biology and Medicine meetings on April 15-18, 2000 at San Diego, California.

 

URINE MALONDIALDEHYDE (MDA) MEASURED BY A FLUOROMETRIC AND VISUALLY READ COLORIMETRIC ASSAY. 

R. Hubbard, R. Iacono, J. Westengard and T. Schoonenberg Depts. of Path., and Neurosurg. Sch. Med., Loma Linda Univ., Loma Linda, CA 92350.

We have measured the urine MDA levels in 17 Parkinson disease (PD patients and care giver controls, by a fluorometric method (Conti et al., Clin. Chem. 37:1272, 1991) and a one step visually read colorimetric method adapted from Miksch et al., Anal Chem 53:2118, 1981, which is available through Apex Energetics, Santa Ana Ca. PD subjects and controls volunteered for the study while attending the 1999 Iocono Pallidotomy Reunion. They collected random midmorning urine’s and signed consent forms approved by the Investigative Review Board, Loma Linda University. To compare the two methods a Spearman rank order correlation coefficient 0.656 (p<0.0005) was computed. A one-way ANOVA with post hoc comparisons (Bonferroni) was performed to compare the mean fluorometric MDA levels across the 4 semi-quantitative levels of the colorimetric method. The results showed that only the highest (level compared to the lowest (level 0) were significantly different (p<0.02). Blind repetition of the colorimetric assay showed a perfect match in the reading for 27 of the 34 urine specimens. The seven non-matched results were within one level of matching. The difference in MDA levels between patients and controls was significant when measured by either the fluorometric (independent t-test, p=0.00005) or the colorimetric (Kruskal-Wallis, p=0.004) method.

This abstract compares results determined with our Free Radical Test Kit (OXIDATATM TEST) with a very complex and sensitive laboratory assay for the same molecule namely malondialdehyde (MDA). MDA is the first breakdown product from the action of “free radicals”. We measure MDA in the urine because the MDA in the blood is quickly cleared from the body by the kidneys and the urine becomes a body fluid where the MDA is concentrated. The urine therefore is the ideal body fluid to measure MDA and thus a very sensitive way to look for free radical activity.

This study compares urinary MDA levels in Parkinson patients versus their normal mates or companion care givers. The two assay methods give very comparable results. The OXIDATATM TEST showed that +3 results were significantly different from blank or zero values. Visual reading of the OXIDATATM TEST results read against the test comparison strip were very repeatable in a blind test comparison showed better than 85% correlation and no result was off by more than one level, e.g. +2 to a +3. The two assays gave very similar significantly higher MDA results in the Parkinson patients versus the controls with the complex laboratory assay giving somewhat more significant results.

 

MALONDIALDEHYDE (MDA) STUDIES IN PALLIDOTOMY TREATED PARKINSON PATIENTS.

R. Hubbard, R. Iacono, J. Westengard, and T. Westengard, and T. Schoonenberg, Depts. of Path. And Neurosurg., Sch. Med., Loma Linda Univ., Loma Linda, CA 92350.

Evidence of oxidative stress in the Parkinson disease (PD) brain is recognized as multifactorial. Chronic use of L-DOPA to treat PD patients may also create oxidative stress. Fourteen pallidotomized Parkinson patients (PPD) (Iacono et al, Neurosurg. 36:1118 (1995) along with four non-pallidotomized PD patients and 17 caregiver controls volunteered for the study. All PD subjects continued their usual dosage amounts of Sinemet, their DOPA therapy source. They signed consent forms approved by the Loma Linda Univ. Invest. Review Board. Midmorning urine’s were collected and fluorometrically assayed for MDA levels from Conti, et al, Clin. Chem 37:1272 (1991). Amino acids were assayed by the method of Hubbard et al., J. Chrom. 431:163 (1988). The PD and PPD subjects compared to controls showed significant elevations in urinary MDA (p<0.006) (independent t-test) versus PD patients. L-DOPA therapy in PD appears to significantly impair tyrosine metabolism, but pallidotomy minimizes this effect and appears to lower L-DOPA requirements which in turn can lower undesirable side effects.

 

URINE MALONDIALDEHYDE (MDA) MEASURED IN PARKINSON DISEASE, BY A FLUOROMETRIC AND A VISUALLY READ COLORIMETRIC ASSAY.

R. Hubbard, R. Iacono, J. Westengard, and Schoonenberg Depts. of Path., and Neurosurg. Sch. Med., Loma Linda Univ., Loma Linda, CA 92350.

We have measured the urine MDA levels in 17 Parkinson disease (PD patients and caregiver controls, by a fluorometric method (Conti et al., Clin. Chem. 37:1272,1991) and a one step visually read colorimetric method adapted from Miksch et al., Anal. Chem. 53:2118,1981, which is available through Apex Energetics, Inc. Santa Ana, CA. PD subjects and controls volunteered for the study while attending the 1999 Iocono Pallidotomy Reunion. They collected random midmorning urines and signed consent forms approved by the Investigative Review Board, Loma Linda University. To compare the two methods a Spearman rank order correlation coefficient 0.656 (p<0.0005) was computed. A one-way ANOVA with post hoc comparisons (Bonferroni) was performed to compare the mean fluorommetric MDA levels across the 4 semi-quantitative levels of the colorimetric method. The results showed that only the highest (level 3) compared to the lowest (level 0) were significantly different (p<0,02). Blind repetition of the colorimetric assay showed a perfect match in the reading for 27 of the 34 urine specimens. The seven non-matched results were within one level of matching. The difference in MDA levels between patients and controls was significant when measured by either the fluorometric (independent t-test, p=0.00005) or the colorimetric (Kruskal-Wallis, p=0.004) method.

by GlutaMaster